Cancer Therapy Advisor

Cancer Therapy Advisor
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Cancer Therapy Advisor

 •  July 19

Evidence published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology demonstrates that anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor-modified T (CAR-T) cell therapy is highly effective in treating high-risk patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) previously treated with ibrutinib.1High-risk patients with CLL are aggressively treated and experience high overall...

Cancer Therapy Advisor

 •  December 1, 2016

Among patients with previously untreated breast cancer, endocrine therapy with fulvestrant significantly prolonged progression-free survival. Among patients with previously untreated hormone receptor (HR)-positive, locally-advanced or metastatic breast cancer, endocrine therapy with fulvestrant significantly prolonged progression-free survival...

Cancer Therapy Advisor

 •  July 26, 2016

The application of chlorhexidine dressings may reduce the incidence of definite or probable catheter-related bloodstream infections. The application of chlorhexidine dressings may reduce the incidence of definite or probable catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) in patients with chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, according to a study...

Cancer Therapy Advisor

 •  March 18, 2016

Subcutaneous rituximab 1600 mg, in combination with fludarabine and cyclophosphamide, achieved trough serum concentrations that were pharmacokinetically equivalent to those achieved with intravenous rituximab 500 mg/m2, a study published in the journal The Lancet Haematology has shown.1 The safety and efficacy profiles were also similar between the...

Cancer Therapy Advisor

 •  July 1, 2015

Ipilimumab at a dose of 3 mg/kg can be infused safely over 30 minutes, rather than 90 minutes, with an acceptably low incidence of infusion-related reactions, a new study published online ahead of print in the Journal of Clinical Oncology has shown.
Because ipilimumab at a dose of 10 mg/kg has been infused over 90 minutes in clinical trials, ...

Cancer Therapy Advisor

 •  June 10, 2015

Deep vein thromboses (DVTs) are significantly more common in the lower extremities, however up to 10% of all DVTs are located in the upper extremities.1,2
In addition to being less common, upper extremity DVTs (UE-DVTs) are also associated with less symptomatic pulmonary embolism and 12 month recurrence when compared with lower extremity DVTs2.
UE ...