Infusion Nurse Blog

Infusion Nurse Blog
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I am a registered nurse (RN) with many years of clinical experience both in the hospital and alternate healthcare settings. I am a certified registered nurse in infusion (CRNI); board certified in vascular access (VA-BC) and have practiced in the specialty of infusion nursing long enough to call myself an “real” infusion nurse. In addition, I also have a business degree (MBA), which allows me to have a unique perspective combined with my critical thinking skills.

Infusion Nurse Blog

 •  May 12

Learn, Discover, Share – another hallmark INS Annual meeting completed this year and this time in a new condensed format. Down to 4 days from the usual 6 days, each day was packed with new learning opportunities from experts and providers in the infusion therapy and vascular access world while offering the same amount of contact hours and/or...

Infusion Nurse Blog

 •  January 25

January 25 this year and every year on this day is a day to celebrate IV Nurse Day!!In 1980, the professional practice of infusion nursing was formally recognized when the United States House of Representatives declared each January 25 as IV Nurse Day. This recognition was the beginning of what the infusion specialty has become. Specialization...

Infusion Nurse Blog

 •  December 15, 2016

I’m sure you’ve seen and used one as a common tool to assess clinician skills in a simulated training environment. There are different PIV checklists used by various healthcare facilities but it is difficult to locate validated checklists to measure practicing clinician PIV insertion skill due to a lack of validity and reliability evidence to...

Infusion Nurse Blog

 •  October 25, 2016

A blog I posted back in 2010 discussed vesicants are not just chemo agents – read post Chemotherapeutic (Cytotoxic) agents are not the only vesicants that cause extravasation injuries. There are non-chemo medications and solutions that have vesicant properties as well and can cause extravasation. Back then, the list of non-chemo vesicants was...

Infusion Nurse Blog

 •  September 22, 2016

This is an updated version of the 2014 publication. The current update (2016) adds 34 drugs, five of which have safe-handling recommendations from the manufacturers. Hazardous drugs include those used for cancer chemotherapy, antiviral drugs, hormones, some bioengineered drugs, and other miscellaneous drugs. This document presents criteria and...

Infusion Nurse Blog

 •  September 14, 2016

In case you missed it, the Infusion Nurses Society (INS) has published an updated position paper on The Role of Unlicensed Assistive Personnel (UAP) in the Provision of Infusion Therapy. UAP is the common term used to describe the various assistive personnel to whom physicians, RNs, and other health care professionals may delegate patient care...

Infusion Nurse Blog

 •  August 19, 2016

It’s hard to believe this blog is now 7 years old!! I am grateful and humbled that you’ve continued to visit, read, post comments, and subscribe to my blog posts. Here’s are the top 7 most read posts this year: Click on the link for the post. 1. “Is there a difference? Osmolarity vs. Osmolality” 2. “Calculating and Counting Drops “ 3. “Q & A: PICC...

Infusion Nurse Blog

 •  July 29, 2016

Q: I am a staff nurse doing home infusion. I’ve seen an increase in new home patients requiring infusions of Remicade and Entyvio this year.I have a patient to start soon and I have found no evidence on how safe these drugs are if administered at home. They are given in a doctor’s office where there is always a doctor present during the infusion...

Infusion Nurse Blog

 •  July 4, 2016

Wishing everyone who celebrate a Happy 4th of July! I’m proud and grateful to call this great country my home. Have a safe and fun celebration.

Infusion Nurse Blog

 •  June 17, 2016

Q: I saw the practice recommendation to limit tourniquet time to less than 1 minute when drawing blood to reduce hemolysis and inaccurate chemistry lab values. Once we stick and get a blood return, we wait till we’ve collected all our blood samples before we release the tourniquet and apply the dressing to the IV site. Is this not recommended? A:...